National Latina Business Women Association

We’re dedicated to empowering women to take care of their hearts through education, lifestyle and, when needed, expert medical care. “By partnering with a physician who understands their personal and cultural heart care needs, Hispanic-American women can lower their risk of heart disease and learn to adopt healthy prevention strategies,” says Dr. Kim, who is a member of the Scripps Women’s Heart Center care team. Heart disease, which is a variety of conditions that affect the heart's structure and function, is the leading cause of death for all women, especially for White and African-American women. It is the second leading cause of death for Hispanic women, (19.6%), just behind cancer, (22% percent), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . Hispanic women face multiple challenges that put them at risk for developing heart disease, including high rates of diabetes, obesity and hypertension.

With the easing of government-mandated closures in recent weeks, employment picked up by 4.1 million from April to May. But overall, job losses remain sizable, with employment decreasing by 20.6 million (or 13%) from February to May. The downturn has affected some Americans more than others, particularly Hispanic women, immigrants, young adults and those with less education. Navarro AM, Raman R, McNicholas LJ, Loza O. Diffusion of cancer education information through a Latino community health advisor program.

Session 3 used video testimonials by http://maxoff.ir/2019/11/30/hidden-responses-to-dominican-women-unmasked/ who were living with HIV to enhance participants’ awareness of HIV risk practices and to dispel common myths about HIV in the Latina community. The health educators also discussed the HIV risk reduction strategies of abstinence, consistent condom use, and having fewer male sexual partners. Session 4 explored how experiences such as immigration, deportation, and acculturation can affect HIV risk among Latina women.

Latinas with advanced degrees only make two-thirds of the salary of their white male counterparts on average, and a similar discrepancy exists for bachelor’s degree and high-school degree holders. Latinas without a high school degree make 27 percent less than white men with similar educational backgrounds.

Latina Equal Pay Day, observed on Nov. 20th this year, is meant to put that gap on display. Something that could help is a minimum wage increase, which would benefit a large amount of Latina workers. The Economic Policy Institute estimates that if the minimum wage were increased to $12 per hour by 2020 – a proposal introduced in Congress that lawmakers ultimately didn’t take up – then more than 35 million workers would receive a raise. The majority of those workers are women, 4.2 million are Latinas, and over 38 percent of Latinos who would benefit are parents.

Otero-Warren was politically well-connected and respected throughout the state for her educational work. Her father had been an influential local leader before he had been murdered by Anglo squatters on his land grant.

That’s nearly 11 months longer, meaning that Latina workers had to work all of 2018 and then this far—to November 20! Put another way, a Latina would have to be in the workforce for 57 years to earn what a non-Hispanic white man would earn after 30 years in the workforce.

  • Vanessa as a Latina immigrant who grew up in poverty in the streets of South- Central LA, knew first-hand what it was to struggle.
  • Vanessa’s main focus has always been to help others, so she developed organizations aimed helping build people and leaders.
  • Being raised by a single mother with 6 brothers and sisters, with minimal relative support lived their lives jumping from house to house, due to financial hardship as her mother possessed limited educational skills and struggled to find employment or childcare.
  • Vanessa knew what it felt like not to have a home, food, or a job and this gave her the strength to develop a passion to live by doing for others.
  • She volunteers her time to pro bono legal clinics, as well as nonprofit organizations whose mission is to support underrepresented individuals in legal and non-legal matters.
  • Ms. Talbott has spoken on matters relating to family law and estate planning, as well as diversity in the legal profession.

Top Cancer Sites For Hispanics (2012

In the United States, female employment has become an increasingly important determinant of family economic well-being, especially among disadvantaged populations such as Latinas. Female employment offers these women more autonomy, the chance to support themselves without relying on a spouse. The Affordable Care Act does not cover non-citizens nor does it cover immigrants with less than 5 years of residency. As a result, Latino immigrants struggle to gain health care once they enter the United States.

LSM covers beauty, business, investing, relationships, and as well as many other topics of interest to Latinas and Hispanic women. HBWA is an online community of Hispanic women entrepreneurs, professionals, consultants, executives, inventors and investors located throughout North America, Latin America, the Caribbean, and Spain interested. Through HBWA you can connect with other Hispanic businesswomen to ​network for customers, capital, special expertise, technology, products, production capacity, or distribution channels. Since 1997, the total number of Hispanic business owners has increased by 82%. Of the 1.4 million companies owned by women of color in the United States, Latina business women control 39 percent of these businesses.

Latina women are the most likely group to be paid at or below the minimum wage, with 5.7% of wage and salary workers earning this amount. Of women in the workforce with advanced degrees (master's, professional, and doctoral degrees), Latinas earn the lowest median weekly earnings of all racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Despite discrimination in the workforce, Latina participation is on the rise. From 1970 to 2007 Latinas have seen a 14% increase in labor force participation, which the Center for American Progress calls "a notable rise." Delays in treatment or inadequate treatment could be due to language barriers, healthcare access, and cost, or to a bias on the part of the healthcare team.

Among Hispanic American women, 78.8 percent are overweight or obese, as compared to 64 percent of non-Hispanic white women. Hispanic women are 2.2 times more likely to be diagnosed with stomach cancer, and 2.4 times more likely to die from stomach cancer, as compared to non-Hispanic white women. Both Hispanic men and women are twice as likely to have, and to die from, liver cancer than non-Hispanic whites.

The 5 Biases Pushing Women Out Of Stem

Despite this, many Latina women are finding their voice through mental health activism. Dior Vargas, a Latina feminist and mental health activists, created Color of My Mind, a collection of content from her People of Color Mental Health Phot Project.